National POW/MIA Recognition Day

POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed on the third Friday of September.

The purpose it to re-commit to full accountability to the families of the more than 80,000 veterans captured or still missing from wars that the United States has participated in.

According to accounts, during the first ceremony of POW/MIA Day at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., fighter airplanes from the military base in Virginia flew in the ‘missing man formation’ in their honor.

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

The term POW and MIA mean prisoner of war and military personnel who went missing in action.

The day was first observed in 1979 after Congress and the president passed a resolution to make it official following the demands of the families of 2,500 Vietnam War POW/MIAs who asked for accountability in finding their loved ones.

It is also mostly associated with service members who were prisoners of war during the Vietnam War.

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

Regardless of where they are held in the country, National POW/MIA Recognition Day ceremonies share the common purpose of honoring those who were held captive and returned, as well as the memory of those who remain missing in service to the United States.

Until 1979, there was no formal day set aside for these important men and women and the first observance of POW/MIA day included a remembrance ceremony at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Since then, the Pentagon is where the official observance happens, with other celebrations happening at military bases around the country and elsewhere.

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

 

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