Delta-8-THC

Thanks to Discover for this:

A variation of the familiar Delta-9-THC compound is growing in popularity among savvy cannabis consumers. But its legality is sticky.

Delta-9-THC, the main drug in cannabis plants that gets people high, can also be a potent medicine. It can treat extreme nausea and stimulate appetite, which is especially helpful for people who have HIV or are going through chemotherapy.

A synthetic version of THC, called Dronabinol, has been used to treat these conditions since the 1980s, although some people prefer their THC to come from the plant itself.

But while marijuana is a relatively mild drug with few side effects — at least, compared to alcohol or tobacco — too much Delta-9-THC has its downsides. It can sometimes spark paranoia and anxiety or trigger dizziness and headaches.

And it’s worth noting that much of the cannabis sold legally in the U.S. contains a high THC concentration.

That’s why many cannabis consumers are turning to an obscure analogue of Delta-9-THC called Delta-8-THC. The difference between Delta-8 and Delta-9 is subtle: Both will get you stoned, but the former is about half as potent as the latter. Many people claim that Delta-8 is a smoother, less anxious psychoactive experience than the more familiar Delta-9. It also seems to have additional medicinal effects than regular THC, such as better pain relief, but these claims have yet to be weighed out in clinical trials.

Delta-8-THC

A Subtle Shift

The cannabis plant is essentially a factory for dozens of different compounds called cannabinoids. The two most popular are also the most abundant: Delta-9-THC and CBD.  But the plant also makes many other so-called minor cannabinoids, including CBG, CBN, THCV and, of course, Delta-8-THC. Most cannabis plants produce very small levels of Delta-8, so to get a usable amount takes a lot of processing and refinement. However, Delta-8 is more shelf-stable than Delta-9, which could make it a better option for prescription drugs.

The main difference between Delta-8 and Delta-9 comes down to the location of a specific bond between two of the atoms that make up each THC molecule. “Delta-8 has the double bond on the 8th carbon in the chain, while Delta-9 has the double bond on the 9th carbon in the chain,” explains Christian Peterson, the co-founder and COO of Wunder, a cannabis beverage company based in San Francisco. Wunder sells a line of Delta-8-infused products that mix Delta-8, Delta-9 and CBD as a replacement for alcohol.

So that’s it? Could the shift in a single carbon bond really cause such a difference in experience? Based on the limited science available, the answer seems to be yes.

“I think it’s been shown that there’s a difference,” says Peter Grinspoon, a primary care physician at Harvard Medical School who specializes in medical marijuana. “People report [Delta-8] as being less anxiety-provoking, less sedating and a little more clear-headed than THC.”

Grinspoon is a board member of the advocacy group Doctors For Cannabis Regulation, which seeks to provide patients with evidence on the pros and cons of medical marijuana. He says Delta-8 has game-changing potential for patients, such as the elderly or children, that are looking for “less confusion and spaciness or stonedness or whatever you want to call it.” But he cautions that the alleged benefits of cannabis-based drugs shouldn’t supersede the evidence.

Delta-8-THC

Rules and Regulations

Delta-8 has a complicated, hazy legality. There’s no question that Delta-9 is highly illegal: Under U.S. federal law, regular THC is a Schedule I substance, which means the government classifies it as dangerous as heroin and LSD. This law, which was passed in 1970, makes research on cannabinoids expensive and difficult — part of why we know so little about Delta-8.

But there was no explicit law banning Delta-8 until this August, when the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) updated their list of controlled substances. A lot of the confusion stems from where Delta-8 is sourced. If it comes from Cannabis sativa, it’s definitely illegal. If it comes from hemp — a form of the same plant, bred with nonintoxicating levels of THC — then it’s legal thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill. Or, so a lot of cannabis companies assumed.

In the meantime, it’s not clear what the future holds for Delta-8. Consumers definitely seem eager to try new, obscure cannabinoids, say both Cassell and Peterson, but whether they can legally purchase them outside of states where recreational cannabis is legal, or whether scientists can easily study them, is still being smoked out.

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