It was a rough summer for the crew and the Mystic Maiden but the Great Lakes water levels are still high

With the exception of Lake Ontario, the Great Lakes water levels remain well above average.  Lake Superior is down one inch in the last month, but up 4″ in the last year and stands 7″ above the October average.  Lake Michigan/Huron is down 3″ in the last month, up 6″ year-to-year and continues to be 11″ above the century average for October.  Lake Erie is also down 3″ in the last month, but is 2″ above the level of one year ago and 10″ above the October average level.  Lake Ontario is the exception due partly to drier conditions in the Northeast this fall.  Ontario is down 7″ in the last month, down 5″ in the last year and is now 4″ below the October average level.  Lake St. Clair is down 5″ in the last month, up 4″ in the last year and like Lake Michigan/Huron is 11″ higher than the October average.

Thanks to Hans Keller for these awesome shots of Raft Off 2016 in Little Muscamoot Bay Lake St Clair

The rivers that connect the Great Lakes are running at above average levels, including the St. Mary’s River that flows from Lake Superior into Lake Huron, the St. Clair River that flows out of Lake Huron into Lake St. Clair, the Detroit River that empties into Lake Erie and the Niagara River that flows out of Lake Erie, over the famous falls and into Lake Ontario.  The Grand River at Grand Rapids reads a flow of 5,250 cubic feet per second.  That’s 3 times the average flow for Oct. 20.  The Kalamazoo River at New Richmond is at 1,970 cfs (average 1,409 cfs) and the St. Joseph River at Niles has a flow of 3,220 cfs (average 2,110 cfs.)  Heavy rain caused flooding in the U.P. this week.  The flow on the Menominee River Thurs. eve. at McAlister WI is 8,500 cfs – four times the average flow of 2,100 cfs.

Buoy temps:  South mid-Lake Michigan buoy 62.6°, North mid-Lake Michigan buoy 60.1°, Muskegon MI buoy 61.9°, Wilmette IL buoy 58.5°.

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